James Webb Space Telescope captures surprisingly crisp images of Neptune and its rings

So far, the James Webb Space Telescope has given us some of the most detailed images of the far reaches of space, giving us insight into the early days of the universe. But now it’s turned to well-tuned lenses to see s*** up close to us, and the results are downright spectacular. These are the infrared images now taken by the James Webb Telescope from MARS, which give us a chance to see the Red Planet in yellow and purple. So, for the layman, what exactly are we looking at here? *** A lot of infrared information taken from the planet *** is the result of the heat being released from it. So, mostly info, but you can see the *** dark orange area near the bottom of the image. This is the Hellas Basin, and it is not only one of the largest craters due to the impact of the *** giant object on MArs, but it is also one of the largest impact craters in the entire Solar System. So what does the discoloration tell us? The deep section shows that Mars’ atmosphere, which is mostly carbon dioxide, is thicker around the crater. And the researchers say this one image has allowed us to divine the presence of not only carbon dioxide, but also carbon monoxide and water in the atmosphere of MARS.

James Webb Space Telescope captures surprisingly crisp images of Neptune and its rings

Video above: James Webb Space Telescope Captures Unexpected Images of Mars New images released Wednesday from NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope are revealing Neptune and the planet’s hard-to-detect rings in fresh light . “It’s been three decades since we saw these faint, dusty rings, and this is the first time we’ve seen them in the infrared,” Heidi Hamel, a Neptune expert and interdisciplinary scientist on the Webb project, said in a news release. Aside from the crisp, narrow rings, Webb images show Neptune’s light dust bands. Some rings haven’t been seen since NASA’s Voyager 2 received the first photographic evidence of the existence of Neptune’s rings during its flyby in 1989. Supersonic winds Dark, cold, and whip, Neptune is the most distant planet in our solar system. The planet and its neighbor Uranus are known as “ice giants” because their interiors are composed of elements heavier than the gas giants Jupiter and Saturn. In the new images, Neptune appears white, in contrast to its characteristic blue appearance in scenes captured at visible wavelengths of light. This is because gaseous methane, the planet’s chemical compound The makeup part, the near-infrared cam of the web Ra (NIRCam) does not see blue. Also visible in the images are methane-ice clouds – bright streaks and spots that appear before sunlight reflects off. absorbed by methane gas. It is also possible to see a bright, thin line circling the planet’s equator, which “could be a visible signature of the global atmospheric circulation that powers Neptune’s winds and storms,” ​​according to the release. Webb also captured seven of Neptune’s 14 known moons, including its largest moon, Triton, which orbits the planet in an unusual backward orbit. Astronomers believe that Triton was probably an object in the Kuiper Belt—a region of icy objects at the edge of the Solar System—that collapsed into the gravitational grasp of Neptune. Scientists plan to use Webb to further study Triton and Neptune in the coming years. Located 30 times farther from the Sun than Earth, Neptune passes through its solar orbit in the remote, dark region of the outer Solar System. At that distance, the Sun is so small and faint that noon on Neptune is similar to a dim twilight on Earth, the news release said. Webb is a mission of over 10 years operated by NASA, the European Space Agency and Canadian Space. agency. Compared to other telescopes, the space observatory’s giant mirror can see distant galaxies and has the potential to increase scientists’ understanding of the origins of the universe. However, it is also using its stable and accurate image quality to illuminate our own solar system with images of Mars, Jupiter and now Neptune.

Video above: James Webb Space Telescope captures unexpected images of Mars

New images released Wednesday from NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope are revealing the hard-to-detect rings of Neptune and the planet in a fresh light.

“This is the last time we’ve seen these faint, dusty rings, and this is the first time we’ve seen them in the infrared,” said Heidi Hamel, a Neptune expert and interdisciplinary scientist on the Webb project. in a news release.

Webb images show Neptune’s faint dust bands, in addition to several crisp, narrow rings. Some rings have not been seen since NASA’s Voyager 2 received the first photographic evidence of the existence of Neptune’s rings in 1989.

Dark, cold and hit by supersonic winds, Neptune is the farthest planet in our solar system. The planet and its neighbor Uranus are known as “ice giants” because their interiors are composed of elements heavier than the gas giants Jupiter and Saturn, which are rich in hydrogen and helium.

Webb's Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCam) images objects from the near-infrared' range of 5 µm, so Neptune is not visible blue #x20; from Webb.  In fact, methane gas is so strongly red; and infrared light that planets dark enough these near-infrared wavelengths, except high-altitude clouds exist.  Such methane-ice clouds are #x20;prominent bright stripes and spots, which reflect sunlight first #x20;by absorbed methane gas.

NASA/ESA/CSA/STSCI

Webb’s Near-Infrared Camera displays images in the near-infrared range of 0.6 to 5 µm, so Neptune does not appear blue to Webb.

In the new images, Neptune appears white, as opposed to the usual blue appearance, captured at visible wavelengths of light. That’s because gaseous methane, which is part of the planet’s chemical makeup, doesn’t appear blue to Webb’s Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCam).

Also visible in the images are methane-ice clouds – bright streaks and spots that reflect sunlight before it was absorbed by the methane gas. It is also possible to see a bright, thin line circling the planet’s equator, which “could be a visible signature of the global atmospheric circulation that powers Neptune’s winds and storms,” ​​according to the release.

Webb also captured seven of Neptune’s 14 known moons, including its largest moon, Triton, which orbits the planet in an unusual backward orbit. Astronomers think Triton was probably an object in Kuiper Belt – a region of icy bodies at the edge of the Solar System – which fell under Neptune’s gravitational pull. Scientists plan to use Webb to further study Triton and Neptune in the coming years.

Located 30 times farther from the Sun than Earth, Neptune passes through its solar orbit in the remote, dark region of the outer Solar System. At that distance, the Sun is so small and faint that noon on Neptune resembles a dim twilight on Earth, the news release said.

Webb is a mission of over 10 years operated by NASA, the European Space Agency and the Canadian Space Agency.

Compared to other telescopes, the space observatory’s giant mirror can see distant galaxies and has the potential to increase scientists’ understanding of the origins of the universe. However, it is also using its stable and accurate image quality to illuminate our own solar system with images of Mars, Jupiter and now Neptune.

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